Tuesday, June 21, 2022

Is Tracing a Horse Allowed?

 There is a very heated, ancient debate in the art world about whether tracing an image onto your art surface is ok. It's a testy subject. Crazy, if you ask me.


 Countless centuries have been spent arguing over this. The traditionalists say it's taboo to trace - literally. Sacrilege.  That you must go through the painstaking process of hand drawing the image. Like an initiation or earning your dues, so to speak. Some people say it's cheating. Yet, the masters like Michael Angelo and his kind did forms of tracing. That's not widely known for some reason.

Still, others, mostly modern artists have found a very beneficial reason for tracing and highly encourage it! Such a huge difference of opinion like we see today about vaccines. I'd like to explain. Do I trace? Sure for extreme accuracy and I like hyper-realism in my art work. And over the years from tracing, I now trace the proportions for accuracy and free hand the images I'm familiar with. I'm going to describe how this applies to horses in a minute.

Why Trace?

  Tracing your image onto an art surface helps you build muscle memory when you do that. So I highly recommend that you practise tracing and encourage your kids to do so if you want to learn how to draw - especially horses :). More importantly, it gives you accurate muscle memory. If you don't have assistance when you're learning to draw free hand, you could run into the problem of developing muscle memory that's inaccurate. Yet, it really feels accurate because it feels so familiar. That's why tracing helps to learn how to draw correctly. It's speeds up the learning process and you can start to freehand images that you're very familiar with in the future.

How Does This Apply to Horses?

 It does apply to horses.  Taking learning to ride for example. If you choose to go the DIY method of learning to ride where you are at home alone using the method of learning by trail and error, without having someone watch you to make sure you're learning how to ride accurately, you could end up learning the wrong thing.

Back in the day, I saw students swear they knew how to ride correctly but they didn't. They hadn't had any formal lessons and they inadvertently developed bad habits or wrong ways to ride. They were so convinced that they were riding properly, that some didn't come back after a few lessons. Blessings to them anyway. We are all here on different paths of learning.

So I highly recommend that a rider learn by a method where someone can give them feedback. What would be equivalent to tracing? I guess the closest thing would be videoing yourself learning to ride and have someone else view the video and give feedback.  

The main take-away here that I'm trying to convey is to make sure that by whatever method you use for anything, horse related in this case, is have a method to get feedback so that you develop accurate muscle memory and not learn the wrong thing.


Putting my spin on Tracing for accuracy.

Reinersue

@KISS Reiners





Saturday, May 28, 2022

Effective Bits Example#1: A Useless Curb Chain

 I was thinking about a good article topic for June, when horse shows are well under way, that I thought it would be good information to remind people. So I had the thought to go on Pixabay (www.pixabay.com) a free reference photo site that I use all the time for my art, to see if I could get an interesting photo of a curb bit and this is what I came up with. 



Can You Spot The Problem?

It's a good example. I'll share my thoughts on why this bit setup is useless - yes useless. The great thing about this photo is that it's anonymous. I just picked it from the website so I'm not offending any one as I don't know them. I wouldn't do that anyway. It's about the bit setup - not the person. We all learn. If you don't know, you don't know.


We all want to know about the bit we're using especially when it's not working. It's one of the most important questions to ask yourself as a rider and especially a trainer. We want to use one that will communicate the best to our horse and yet, not turn the horse off to using one. Or worse, turn our horse into a bad behaviour horse. eek!


Before I describe the bit to you, I want to make a point about all bits....

The bottom line is: If the bit is effective, then it's the right bit to use.

That's it. Just remember that and you will do fine! 


Not Effective Curb Chain

In the case with the above example, this bit is not effective.  The curb chain is so loose that it cannot work as the fulcrum in a curb bit. Curb bits work on the principle of a fulcrum for leverage. I encourage you to research it for yourself especially if you're having problems.



Doesn't matter how many parts, whether it's an english pelhum or a Tom Thumb, is the mouthpiece broken, jointed, solid, brass, copper, bla, bla, bla.  Is it effective? Is it effective for you and your horse.

In this case, the horse will just ignore this bit and quickly too. Depending on the mouthpiece, the horse will feel discomfort in at least the corners of his/her mouth. The rider will inadvertently have to pull harder and harder over time to get the response they want and that's not something we as riders want to learn. We want to have quiet hands. That's a topic for another day. Please see my website www.reinersuehorsemanship.com for information on quiet hands. There is a great search function if you need it.


Formula for the Right Bit

Part of the formula of the right bit is to have the curb chain situated to act properly as the fulcrum of the curb bit. That's why curb bit's are often mentioned with a ratio to describe the relationship of the rider's pressure to the pressure felt in the horse's mouth. If it's a 2:1 ratio, then if the rider exerts 10lbs of pressure through the reins to the bit and the curb chain is working properly, the horse will feel 20lbs pressure through the mouthpiece. The point is for the rider to have/maintain soft hands.

In the above example, that would not work. It would be a 1:1 radio and work like a snaffle bit (which is a 'direct pull' bit and not a leverage bit. Notice I don't mention anything about the mouthpiece. It's not about the mouthpiece.) Sadly, the horse would learn to pull against this bit, get heavy handed in other words and would not have any 'brakes'.

What to do? What to do?

Ok. This is an easy fix. Simply tighten up that curb chain so that it sits comfortably in the chin groove of the horse. The tighter fit to that chin groove, the quicker the horse will feel the pressure of the bit against several parts of their mouth including the tongue. And that is a good thing IF the rider's hands are soft. Talk about a horse whisperer! :)


I hope you enjoyed this. I did. Reminds me of my passion for an understanding of bits and their function. I think I will do more of these. If someone wants a bit evaluation, please contact me.

Putting my spin on effective bits. 
Reinersue - Myler Bit Technical Certified
©Copyright 2022 KISS Reiners

Tuesday, April 26, 2022

Why I Do What I Do Too

 

Why Do We Have a Life With Horses?

I receive a regular email from a new-to-me equine artist, Adeline Halvorson from Saskatoon. She paints mostly horses and farm life. Adeline Halvorson Fine Art website. Photo is of a recent painting from Adeline's website where she has many fine paintings for sale.


Waters Edge by Adeline Halvorson

She sent an email recently titled: "Why I do What I do" - explaining how as a little horse-crazed girl would sit at the end of her lane on Fair Day, hoping to catch a glimpse of a horse's head pop out the top of a truck box as it headed to the fair. 


Adeline described a childhood with horses where she had a typical obnoxious pony who would buck her off.  And how she went on to have some very pleasant experiences with a colt she had to share with her sisters and mother. She explains that she would dedicate most of her life to painting these beautiful animals. IMO, she does an amazing job.


I was a little sad to hear that she was not fortunate to have what she calls a 'heart horse' - that special horse we share a deep bond with. Humbly, I am fortunate that I have one of those special horses. I've had my retired reining mare now for 19 years this October. I can relate to what she's talking about. I figure that my special mare has 5-10 more years left and I'm not so sure that I will get another horse to replace her. She can't be replaced.

Reflecting by Adeline Halvorson

Adeline Paints Horses

"It occurred to me that painting horses is my way of creating that connection that I so wanted with a horse. The horses on my easel always look back at me with affection. Or at the very least with interest. And I will continue to do it. Perhaps because deep inside, I am still that little girl that just wanted a pony of her own!"


I, too share that desire to paint horses. For some of you, it's showing your horse, or having a horse as a pet. How many of you are reflecting on your experiences with horses as a child or that special horse in your life.


This hits my heart for me right now as I lost my old, beloved dog Logan that I talked about in my last article. We just gotta hug those special 4-legged family members more often.



Putting My Spin On Capturing Our Beloved Horses

Reinersue

@KISS reiners

Thursday, March 17, 2022

Time for Family and Regrouping

 

You know when you hear that saying: "Some times the event finds you and sometimes you find the event." Last year I was unable to be a NRHA judge's assistant. It would've been my 30th year. I was a little disappointed but I knew in my heart that it was obviously best to decline.  I will have to decline again this year for the same reason. It's interesting what life brings.

Time moves on and people and our loved ones get older.  My pet sitter was not able to farm sit for me last year due to his health. He now has someone to look after him full time which is good. Life happens. So I'm still looking for a pet sitter.

In the meantime, my beloved dog Logan turned 17 years old last month. That's the main reason why I couldn't work as a judge's assistant last year and now. As you can see from the picture, Logan is still here surprisingly and I cherish every day he's still around. He's a big part of my family. He needs a lot of looking after so I couldn't leave him. I think of him like an old man who can still basically function but has a lot of trouble getting around.


So when life changes our daily routines, we go for it. With an incursion going on in Ukraine and innocent people are getting killed, I think we need to hug our loved ones closer and regroup. We need to be thankful for our health.  Who knows what's going to happen this year especially in Canada.

Wintertime Manure Handling

On a positive note, I've been inventing new ideas for handling my horse's manure - believe it or not.  The snow was getting too high for me to walk outside and spread my horse's manure so I thought of a great idea.

I use a plastic toboggan as my manure cart. In this photo, you can see my mare tied to the cross ties and the manure toboggan tied to the back of her winter blanket.  

After the cart is full, I attach reins to my mare's halter and walk her outside to the yard. Using a mounting block, I hop on bareback and we ride out to the field. I have a rope that I use while still on my horse's back to tip the manure cart over to dump the manure once I get to the spot in the field that I want to dump. I kid you not. I then ride back to the barn and repeat the process.

My mare doesn't mind as she gets a bit of crunch on each return. I've really enjoyed it as it's given me many short rides and time with my horse. Again, keeping our loved ones close. By the way, my mare is 20 years old this year so I cherish every day I'm with her also.



 My your life be filled with close family as we deal with the difficult times.


Putting My Spin On Keeping Our Loved Ones Close

Reinersue

@KISS Reiners


Monday, January 24, 2022

Ole Smokie and Catch Up On Goals

 January Blahs.   I don't seem to have time for the blahs.  Don't you find that time really is speeding up.

I like the idea where people aren't making news years resolutions any more. Seems like it's passé.

One goal I gave myself after I sold my 2 yr. old reining filly last Sep. was to complete a fine art certification.  After 3 months, I can proudly say that I have completed it.




Do The Small Chores Around The Farm

  My old reining mare Jackie will be 20 years old in April.  I remember more than 15 years ago when I used to burn old papers in a burn barrel at the farm I had at the time. I remember someone cautioning me about not having a fire close to horses as it would scare them.   

Scare them!?!  I had to catch myself from laughing out loud. I was having to keep my horses away from getting too close to the fire. I was always introducing new things to them for training and entertainment.  I still do it today though I'm down to only 1 ole mare.

This winter I'm having to burn some weedy hay I have that the horse doesn't like. In the first photo you can see my mare just eating good hay while I improvised and am using my old round bale feeder as the burn barrel.


  Just to prove that my mare really doesn't care about the fire, I have another photo of my mare having walked past it.



  I think 2022 is going to be a crazy year with all the things happening in the world. I want to give a big shout out to all those truckers , at the time of writing this article, heading to Ottawa to save Canada. My dad was a trucker and my brother is one also.  I'm very proud of those truckers.

Putting A Spin On Things To Do In The Wintertime
Reinersue
@KISS Reiners


Monday, October 25, 2021

Learning Skills Elsewhere

 SusieQ

I wanted to give you an update about my 2yr old filly SusieQ that I featured in this column for 2 years now. We watched her progress together. I sold her a month ago and she is going on to be a reining horse. I'm looking forward to seeing her next year at the shows.


 I want to share with you that I felt so proud on how well she rode for me and the new owner the day she came and bought her. I will always remember that.

So what do I do now?  AT 60, I've decided not to start anymore horses under saddle - been there, done that 50 times. I can proudly say that throughout my horse training career I never got bucked off from starting a horse under saddle. It was clients being less than truthful (down right voiding their contracts) that sent me to the hospital a few times with broken ribs and other damaged parts. And why I got out of doing that. I have the on-going physical problems as constant reminders from those experiences. How many of you can also recall a similar story or know someone who does?

A Well Trained Horse

There is something to be said for a well trained horse. I still have my 19yr old retired reining mare Jackie. She's been with me 18 years and I plan on looking after her until she passes on. Most or all of you know that it's a labour of love for us horse people. It's in our DNA. 


Bush Wacking

I have used my mare to bushwack many times. I wonder what she thinks about when we do that. "Oh Mom is at it again!" lol.


 I bought this mini chainsaw I call it. Works great for cutting small branches in the bush. See if you can picture this - I've just side passed Jackie up against a tree where I then stand up in the saddle and use this mini chain saw to cut the low hanging branch. It's great fun!

  I had a chuckle at myself when I decided to tie a knot at the end of my reins. I hated to do that but I wouldn't loose them when I stood up to cut a branch. You can see in the picture the knot in the reins and a roll of orange trail marker ribbon with me to better mark the trails.



Learning New Skills

  This is what I like to do. I have to create new projects or I get bored. My mare's used to it! lol I hope you got some inspiration from this article on learning new skills with our horse!  Happy fall!

Putting My Spin on New Skills

Reinersue

@KISS reiners


Wednesday, September 15, 2021

Bits Do Help If You Let Them

 What Do You Wrongly Know About Bits

  I got a nice phone call from a lady who does trick riding and wanted some advice on perhaps needing a different bit for her horse. She said that my friend Brenda Gagnon of Lazy G Ranch recommended me.  We talked for hours!  

I love talking about bits.  The first photo is of me during my Myler technical bit certification. Dale Myler is adjusting the bit on the horse.



I take a lot of pride in reeducating people on bits as there is a lot of misinformation out there. And disinformation. So Barry Finn, editor of TheRider.com magazine and I agreed that it would be nice to write a series of articles busting the myths about bits.

So here we go...


 Scare-De-Cat

A lot of riders just use whatever bit their fellow riders of their sport use. It's easier that way. I would agree that it's a good place to start. I know I did. I got the reining bit for showing that reiners used back in the 80's and still use today.

 Nothing wrong with that, if it works. That's the key... if it works. But what if it doesn't - what then?  You can ask the local tack shop owner or someone else but the problem is that misinformation is taught to everyone including trainers. Usually without their knowledge. Whether its pride or ignorance that people don't want to know technically about bits, I can't say. I'm not going there but I have studied that too to know the source of why riders are hesitant to 'go down the bit route'.

My Latest Change

 So the snaffle bit that I was using on my 2yr. old was not working any longer. The horse was dull on that bit and basically ignored it. I made her pay attention to the bit better but I knew that I didn't want to have to get after her for not responding quickly. Her mother was like that.  So there are family lines or horse genetics where some horses have naturally thicker tongues and usual bits can be ignored. 

A horse with a thicker tongue easily learns to ignore the cue from a standard bit. Generally speaking, for example, draft horses have thicker tongues. When I have a lazy horse and they are not responding well to the bit, I first think of checking their tongue. Believe it or not, some horses have tongues too big for their mouth. Great Pine bred horses were known for dull mouths and dull sides. My Whizard Jac mare for example is very sensitive to a bit as do hotter bred horses. The horse is always one part of the equation obviously, in determining what bit to use.

For my filly, I wanted to stay soft with my hands. I've seen too many riders having to be rougher with their hands to get the response they need from their horse. That's another clue - needing to be rougher with your hands than you want to be. I don't like it at all so I tend to go to a curb bit faster than most riders.

Be An Educated Rider
I use the analogy of a 'hot knife through butter'. For the rider's sake and the horse's sake, you don't want to learn to be rough with your hands. Educated hands can use most bits and not have a problem.
Most riders are taught to consider only the horse and the event they want to do with their horse and not realize how important the rider is in the equation. I always shock people when I mention how important that is. I will get into more detail in the next article about that.

Back to my filly, so it was time to put my filly into a curb bit. I choose the Myler 3-ring combination bit. See photo.

Myler 3-Ring Combo Bit




I use this bit as a training bit and introduces leverage to a horse. A rider can keep their hands softer while having more effect on the horse. More information to come. Lots to talk about with the trick rider who called and wanted to see if a different bit could be used for her horse that was running through the bridle - another common problem.

Putting My Spin on Using The Equipment That Works Best

Reinersue

@KISS Reiners

Wednesday, August 4, 2021

Tips For Getting Back Into the Saddle - Part 3 In The Saddle

 This is the third part of a series on how to get motivated to get back into the saddle again.  Next month I will focus on more training tips. I also have a very interesting story to tell about bits.

Today I'm going to focus on actual riding tips.

My 2yr old filly is now for sale so I want to keep training her until she's sold. And I believe introducing her to as many new situations as possible will make her a better horse and more interesting to potential buyers. (If you are interested, please see contact me.)

Pre-Ride Check


 I learned to do this with horses that I was not familiar with. I would lounge the horse to see where the horse is at mentally and physically. As I became more familiar with them then not so much.

I also did a pre-ride check. I would flex the horse from the ground on both sides. Again, checking the horse over to make sure they were ok and mentally ok to ride. It's a pain when you're out in the back bush or have trailered over to someone's place, only to find out that you're missing equipment or your horse is lame. Argh.

In the first photo I am showing how I also make the horse stand still when I first get on by doing some flexing from side to side. This, I feel is necessary for unfamiliar horses or young horses. I never have to do this with my old, retired reining mare.  

I started this because I'm short. I kid you not. It's generally a bit of a hike to get on my horses even if I use a mounting block. For my safety, I didn't want the horse to walk off while I was getting on or just getting settled in. I really don't like it when they walk off.

 Riding In The Bush

My first love was trail riding. Add rounding up cattle to that and it's fantastic. While I don't have any cattle at the moment, I do have 30 acres of bush to ride in. Last year, with the help of my hired guy, we put 4.5 miles of ATV trails in the bush.



So that it where I'm riding my filly. In the 2nd photo, you can see that we are riding down the side of one of my hay fields to get to one of the entrances to the bush.

When I get bored riding in a riding pen, I usually head out to the bush or the roads. That is what I would suggest to make it interesting to get back into the saddle again.

Why not try a trail ride? Why not work some cattle?  Why not try a new sport?

Pony Up SusieQ

  I didn't start by riding my filly on the trails. I pony'ed her. In this last photo, you can see that I took her for a nice walk in the bush.



Again, another way to make things interesting. I hope you enjoy the rest the of the summer.


Putting My Spin On Rides In The Bush

Reinersue

@KISS Reiners


Friday, May 28, 2021

Tips For Getting Back Into Riding Part 2

 

In part 1, I talked about why sometimes we get out of the habit of riding and need ways to easily get motivated again.  You can find the article link here. Part 1 focused more on tools and the process of getting ready to ride. Today I'm going to talk about other tips we can do with regards to actually riding or pre-riding.




So I'm working on my 2 yr. old filly to get her basic training done. I have my environment ready and now I want to work her.  The principle still holds that if I spend some time prepping and setting up the riding environment so that it makes it more enjoyable and easy to want to get back into riding or training and easier it is to get back into the saddle.  It's all mental preparation.

I do the same for my taxes. I don't particularly like doing my taxes so I do my books and leave the rest to my accountant. So I spend a day getting my office setup with my computer and my slips to do my books. I just find that it makes it easier for me to get it done. That and a big pot of coffee!

So that's it! To make whatever changes you need to do to make it exciting and enticing.  This article will focus on pre-riding specific tips.

Here are a few suggestions that you might find helpful. More detailed information on my website www.reinersuehorsemanship.com, if you're interested.

1. Sometimes I just don't feel 100%. Whether I'm too tired or a bit under the weather for whatever reason, I have found that if I do some GROUNDWORK exercises then I know that I've worked the horse and feel great about it. Here in this photo, I have saddled my 2 yr old filly and I've attached empty vinegar jugs to the side of the saddle. More DESENSITIZATION - one of my favorites! :)

It's also good for the horse to get 'back into the swing' of things as well.


2. I do use round penning and lounging as good exercises to teach horses many things. I teach all leg cues with the use of my stick-n-string, all voice cues, flexing... I have a list (see below). So I do spend time including when I need motivation to get back working my horse again by going through round penning and lounging. I also use them as a quick check to see where my horse is at. Here in this photo I show some lounging.



3. My training program has always been heavily based on reining principles and groundwork. I used to spend the first week with a customer's horse on groundwork to teach all the cues needed before I got onto the horse for the first time. I did that last year with my filly. Don't need to teach it again but it's still good to check everything before I get on. And get my mind into training again.

4. Here is some of what can be accomplished with groundwork.

  • establish mutual respect and trust between horse and human
  • establish communication between horse and rider
  • getting rewarded for a positive response
  • establishing good habits in your and your horse
  • teach the horse to pay attention to you as team leader (& establish you as team leader)
  • establish basic body control on the horse (lateral flexion, sidepassing, etc..)
  • familiarize/learn the step-by-step progressive process in training (ie. training scale) 
  • teach the horse to respect your space
  • determining temperament of the horse to customize training program
  • learn to read the horse's body language and visa versa
  • establish a mental connection with your horse
  • start to teach the horse to handle pressure in training
  • teach the horse to follow you (hooked on you)
  • establish & reinforce forward motion in the horse (which is so important)
  • teach the horse voice commands like the 'kiss', 'cluck', 'whoa', etc.
  • teach a horse to stop and backup using voice and rein cues
  • to create confidence in you and your horse
  • do a system's check to make sure everything is OK before mounting.
  • make sure your cinch is tight enough before mounting.
  • for the rider to really like being around their horse & visa versa!

I feel that groundwork has been invaluable in my training program and would ALWAYS recommend it - even for motivation. Next month, I'm going to continue with my filly's training and give more tips. 


Putting My Spin on Getting Back Into Training Mode

Reinersue

@KISS Reiners

Thursday, May 27, 2021

Tips to Get Back Into Riding/Training Again Part 1

 

Life gets busy.  Springtime is always busy for me with outside landscaping. I have a lot of branches to trim and fence rows to clear.  Anyone who has a farm or a property knows what I'm talking about.

And the weather was crazy this spring. I don't like riding in the cold.  

Whether you are just coming off of an injury or you were away on business for a time period, say a month, or like me - was too busy and you now what to get back INTO THE HABIT OF RIDING AGAIN. What are some ways that can help you get motivated?



So now I have to get serious about getting my 2yr. old filly trained.  I started her last fall where I sat on her a few times and walked 10feet a few times. It's really about the repetition.

How I Motivated Myself To Get Back Into Training Mode Easily

Basically, I found that if I spent a day or two prepping and setting up the riding environment so that it makes it more enjoyable and easy to want to get back into riding or training then the easier it is to get back into the saddle.

I do the same for my art. I like to do my fine art mostly in the wintertime when I can't get outside to do yard work so the weather makes it easy for me to stay inside.  Now it's spring and I want to be more outside. So I finally ordered myself a proper art table to work on and I'm excited to get the table setup and try it out! Love those rainy days.  It all helps to create the right environment. 

So that's it! To make whatever changes you need to do to make it exciting and enticing.

Here's a few suggestions.

1. I've made it easier to have all my tack near my riding pen so it's easy to do the tack up/down faster. My filly is already bored with being saddled (due to her training as a yearling) so it's no big deal for her. I don't need to spend any special time on it any more.  In this photo, I am showing my saddle cart with wheels.



2. I also set up an area for my groundwork tools to be stored close to the riding pen. Again, just to make it easier to grab my tools. I'm actually using some space in my utility shed.  Another idea would be to get a tack box with big wheels and handle so that it's easier to move around.  Here in this photo I am showing a tool box on wheels and a handle.



3. I remembered a checklist that I made for colt starting and for groundwork training that I did for clients back when I was training. I would fill out these checklists and provide them to the client. I dug out a copy and I'm going to use it for myself with my filly to make sure I've covered everything.

4. I also saved these custom banners that I made for myself back when I had my arena with the steps on how to do a particular training phase - beginner, intermediate, advanced. Groundwork and riding. I'm going to dig those out and attached them to my riding pen.

5. I placed 2 small tables near my riding pen to hold my camera, phone and checklists. 

I feel like I will be well organized and ready to get right into training again. For part 2 next month, I'm going to talk about some other tips that do more with actual riding. Link here for part 2.

For one last motiviation, here's a youtube video of Gene Autry singing Back In the Saddle Again. enjoy!


Putting My Spin on Getting Back Into Training Mode

Reinersue

@KISS Reiners


Tune up Styles

 One of the best ways to prevent problems from starting is to be proactive - to 'nip it in the bud' so to speak. As Dr. Don Hogland would say: "Horses can't unlearn." So... one of the ways to prevent your horse from getting to the point of not responding well and needing a tune up is to be proactive about it. No one wants a horse that is disrespectful either.


This article continues with the series of articles on tuning up your horse - fixing their problems - but from a different perspective - a coach.


Tune Up Scale
So far we have discussed options involving fixing the problems yourself to the complete opposite end of the scale of sending it to a trainer. See drawing above where I show the two opposites.

Here is a review list of options so far:
1. You can learn how to train your own horse and therefore fix their problems with the help of a trainer (Option #3), if you're into that sort of thing like I am.

2. Similarly, you can learn to train your own horse/fix problems all by yourself - the DIY option (Option #2). This is the extreme end of the Tune Up Scale or spectrum.

3. Or you can send it to a trainer (if you're not into training) whether it's for a tune up or more serious problem solving. (Option #1Does My Horse Need A Tune Up?).
Let's look at some options in the middle of the scale.

Tune Up Spectrum
What I'm really talking about is a spectrum of options or choices. As you can see from my drawing below, I have and will talk about 5 options ranging from Send-To-A-Trainer to DIY.




Horse Lessons will be covered in the next article. So this article talks about the Lesson/Coaching option.

Tune Up While You Are In A Lesson
A lot of my students, especially the intermediate to advanced ones, are interested in learning to improve their horsemanship skills in the area of training.
 
Once a student learns how to ride, their goals reach further towards keeping their own horse tuned up - just a little. They often want to try fixing their horse - just a little - to see if they like it. They don't want to make a mess of it - yet, it would be a good skill to have for a rider.

So while I am teaching students how to ride or how to rein or how to handle their horse better - any type of coaching - I will provide the student with the 'how to' on keeping their horse tuned up.

Being Aware
I teach the students how to become aware or notice when a horse is not responding well. It's not a one time thing. It's when the horse is repeatedly not responding well despite all the rider's efforts to get the horse to do as they ask. You would almost think the horse is developing a bad habit. - It could lead to that. A lack of respect perhaps?

This is the time where the horse needs to be tuned up. RIGHT WHEN IT HAPPENS.

So most of my students are quiet happy to learn to correct the problem before it gets worse.

It's quick.

It's easy.

It just becomes part of their learning how to ride.


And their horse stays tuned up in the process. Great eh!

Next article I will complete the series of tune up articles with the horse lessons.

Sunday, April 25, 2021

Pleiadean Horses Called Lin

 

Do you believe in panspermia?  (Definition here.) Basically space rocks with seeds of the world landed here on Earth and populated the planet with all the plants and animals, supposedly.

Do Horses Come From the Pleiades?

There are many species of equines throughout our solar system according to a youtube channel called Pleiadian Knowledge. * 

There are also 3 types of equines native to the Taygeta Star System of the Pleiades Star Cluster. You can watch the information in the youtube video:  Equines of Taygeta.



You can also download a transcript of the video: "Equines in Taygeta.pdf -Version 1" from their facebook page: Pleiadian Knowledge PDF.

According to their transcript, there are many equine species all throughout our Solar System and other solar systems such as Taygeta. The Taygetans refer to their equines species as 'Linhas'. The Taygetan's have a language close to the Navajo Indians.

#1 Lin of Temmer and Erra Planets of Taygeta

  The species of equines most resembling our Earth horses are called 'Lin'. They look like part zebra - part buckskin. On average they are 30% smaller than domesticated horses on earth. They have most of the coat colors of our horses except pinto but most of them are brindle.


 As you can see from the photo, their stripes are mostly along the neck, back and legs and not uniform throughout like our zebra.

Another interesting characteristic is that they have a split hoof similar to our deer or cattle here on Earth called even-toed ungulates.   And they are not domesticated.


#2 Smaller Lin of Erra - Merychippus


As you can see from this next photo, there is a smaller version of the Lin specifically on the planet Erra. Again, they are mostly brindle with a split hoof

They are similiar to an extinct species of Equus on Earth called the Merychippus. Wikipedia Definition here .



#3 Smallest Lin 'Bosh ke sh' - Eohippus

As you can see from the photo below, they are about the size of a large dog. They live mainly in forests.  They most closely resemble that of an extinct species of North American equine called Eohippus. Definition here.



*Special Credit

*Credit here for all this knowledge is given to Estella Fernandez and Cristina Alvarez of Pleiadian Knowledge.


Putting My Spin on Worldly Equines

Reinersue

@KISS reiners

 

Saturday, March 27, 2021

Beginning Of The Year Changes

 

Beginning Of The Year Changes    

It's Spring. Many riders consider their current horse at the start of the year and contemplate a change. What process does a rider go through in considering a new horse?

Evaluating a horse's current training level and abilities allows the rider to establish a 'base point' or starting point for a tune up. From there, a customized step-by-step progressive training program is developed that will really work for the horse based on the horse's temperament and learning ability. Makes sense... And of course we have to factor in the rider's abilities and experience.



But what if the horse "can't cut it"?  Do you take it to a trainer for evaluation? Sounds good. Is there also a way to evaluate your own horse to be knowledgeable when the rider discusses their horse's problems with their trainer (or horse friend ). Another good idea.


Silk Purse Out of A Sow's Ear  

Of course the hardest part of the self-evaluation is being realistic and honest about the capabilities of our horse to meet our goals. A custom program works best if it MEETS the 
realistic expectations of the owner or rider. It's doomed to fail or be mediocre at best. That's hard for an owner/rider and a waste of a training bill.

Horses today are specialized for certain events so some horses may not be able to meet the owner's expectations. No amount of training can make up for an untrainable horse. Or one not suited to the job.



Lady's Starting Point - an example



Lady had been shown for many years. I had known Lady since she was 10 days old. I was looking for a reining lesson horse and Lady was 9 years old when I decided to buy her.
My evaluation determined that though Lady had had many , many show pen miles on her which meant that she rushed through the reining pattern and had been used for reining lessons, I knew that she needed a tune up. She had been used as a broodmare and trail horse for several years.

Tool Bag- Horse's Can't Unlearn What They Already Know

As a general riding horse, as with many riders, horses tend to acquire a set of skills in their 'tool bag' ( as I like to call it) that allows them to get away with or resisting requests by the rider. The less-than ideal horse sees how much they can get away with not doing. In the case of Lady, she would over think the problem and then hurry up and get it done. A bit on the nervous side. 

Dull Mouth and Dull Sides?
So Lady as with typical horses used for trail riding, they get heavy or dull on the sides and mouth. In Lady's case, she was over reactive. 

Previous Training or Quick Study
Since I had known Lady's history and I found out that she was over eager to please and I really liked her temperament, I was happy to call her my own and take the time I needed to calm her down. It turned out that I was able to show her for a season.  I had Lady for 13.5 years before she passed away. So sometimes it's worth to take the chance. 

She is also the grandmother of the 2 year old I have now. It was because of her that I wanted to get a foal from her daughter. 


Putting My Spin On Evaluations
Reinersue
©Copyright KISS Reiners



Wednesday, March 3, 2021

The Buck Stops Here

 Here's one GOOD example why we switch AND STAY with longeing over round penning (once we know how to round pen that is... :). (Leslie had to use round penning in the barn yard the other day cause her horse didn't want to come to her. Soon fixed that :)

 
For the bucking....
 
With longeing, when the horse starts to buck, MAKE HIM DO SOMETHING to stop the bucking... ie. correct him. pull hard on the longe line & make him change directions quick. Do something.... so that he knows that bucking is not OK.  Give him shit. Yell. Tell him it's not ok. Change directions each and every time he bucks until he stops bucking; making is harder and harder for him to buck because he's changing directions quickly and so frequently.
 
We can't do that as easily round penning.  A few times round penning initially is tolerable. It let's us know something could be wrong. 
Now we know, from the repeated times, that he just likes to buck under saddle and that's not ok; AT ALL.  It's ok if he wants to do it in the field with his buddies but not when he's working.  I longed him every Monday and when I thought he needed it and he didn't buck because I changed directions with him and made him do it each and every time he bucked.
 
'The buck stops here!'